Summer Landscaping

With August just around the corner, we wanted to gather some of our favorite articles for late summer. The end of summer brings a variety of different landscaping options and things to address. We usually tend to see heatwaves during the month of August, before heading into September to transition into fall. Below are our 5 favorite late summer articles to help you through the next couple of months.

 

Late Blooming Summer Perenials
Black Eyed Susan – A Michigan native late blooming summer perennial.
Hydrangea
Hydrangea

Hydrangeas

Hardiness Zones: 4-9

Plant Height: 3 – 18 feet

Plant Width: 3-18 feet

Light: Partial – Full Shade

 

 

Hydrangea are shade-loving plants that offer huge bouquets of clustered flowers. They are available in various arrangements and bloom from summer through fall. The different varieties of hydrangea differ in size, flower color, and blooming time. These plants thrive in fertile, moist, well-drained soil in partial to full shade.

TIPS FOR PLANTING & GROWING HYDRANGEA

  • Consider the location of you hydrangea prior to planting, you want to choose a spot where it can reach it’s full size without pruning. The averaged sized hydrangea will reach 4 ft x 4 ft.
  • Plant in well-drained soil, heavy soil can cause damage and you will want to add roughage (such as mulch).
  • Do not over water, over watering can lead to root rot.
  • Plant at the same depth the hydrangea was planted in the pot as you do not want to plant too deep.
  • The best time to plant is in early summer or late fall.
  • To transplant a hydrangea, do so when it has become dormant and no longer has any leaves (late fall or winter).
  • Do not plant under a tree as the root system from the tree’s are often to aggressive and are grown to the rich moist soil hydrangeas love.
  • If you are seeking blue hydrangea flowers, check the pH level of your soil it should be in the 5.2-5.5 range. If your soil’s level is above this level you can apply aluminum sulfate in the spring to lower it to the range needed. The change in flower color is a direct result of the higher aluminum content and lower pH level in the soil.
  • Do not trim or prune hydrangeas in the fall unless you are removing spent flowers. Most hydrangeas bloom on old stems and removing these can remove next years flowers. The pest time to prune a hydrangea is when new growth has begun, in which you should remove any dead branches. This could be very late Spring.
  • In Michigan hydrangeas will benefit from winter protection or sheltered placement. Without protection most hydrangeas will not survive the winter if placed in an open area.

 

 

May is upon us once again and that means Spring flowers have bloomed and Summer flowers are soon to follow. Today we have gathered up all our favorite flower post, for our Flower Roundup.

  • The Benefits Of Flowers – Florist have long known, what many recent studies have scientifically proven, that flowers are a symbol of happiness. Flowers create a positive impact on peoples lives, especially in an a time where there is less time to connect with nature.
  • Gardening Color Theory –  Color theory covers a variety of definitions, concepts and design applications. When it comes to gardening and landscape design color is usually the most prominent factor in the design process and the first one considered.
  • Creating A Coloful Garden – Color is a great way to enhance the overall look and feel of your garden. When it comes to gardening and landscape design color is usually the most prominent factor in the design process and the first thing considered. Color draws people in and people know what they like when they see it.
  • Gardening Benefits Of Marigolds – Marigolds are hardy annual plants, that are available in numerous varieties. Marigolds offer a variety of health and garden benefits. The flowers of the calendula marigold have been used for centuries for their health benefits. While the more common tagetes variety does not offer as many health benefits they do offer gardening benefits.

 

Fall gardening with Hardy Mums
Fall Gardening With Mums
Fall Gardening With Mums

Fall gardening, can bring about a variety of challenges, especially in cooler northern climates. Chrysanthemums, more commonly known as “mums” are available in a variety of colors and can withstand the cooler autumn days of cooler climates.

These beautiful flowers make a great addition to any fall garden. They also look great in any pots you may want to move around your home for an extra pop of color once your summer flowers are gone.

Hardy Mums love full sun and bloom from September through October. There are different varieties that grow in a variety of different zones, so be sure to get an appropriate variation for your climate. Michigan Zones range from 4-6, the metro Detroit area being zone 6.

**In order to survive the winter hardy mums should be planted in the early spring.

 

Marigolds are hardy annual plants, that are available in numerous varieties. Marigolds offer a variety of health and garden benefits. The flowers of the calendula marigold have been used for centuries for their health benefits. While the more common tagetes variety does not offer as many health benefits they do offer gardening benefits.

Marigold
Marigold

Planting marigolds in your vegetable gardens will help keep away moles, deer and other animals. Marigolds have also been said to repel insects, however is this not an accurate statement. Marigolds actually attract beneficial insects such as ladybugs, parasitic wasps and lacewings which all prey on harmful garden insects reducing the amount of damaging insects found around your garden.

Marigolds also help eliminate nematodes, with toxins found within the plant. Nematodes, are small microscopic worms that damage the roots of vegetables. This a proven theory, which especially helps with tomato plants which are most affected by nematodes. In addition to these gardening benefits Marigolds are available in a variety of colors, which will help brighten up any garden.

Your homes garden is a great way to reflect your personality and create a special space for you and your family to enjoy. Color is a great way to enhance the overall look and feel of your garden. When it comes to gardening and landscape design color is usually the most prominent factor in the design process and the first thing considered. Color draws people in and people know what they like when they see it.

When it comes to color theory there are two different options to consider when thinking about colors for your garden, harmonious and contrasting. Harmonious are colors that are next to each other and share a similar value. Contrasting colors are the complete opposite and do not share any similarities.

One harmonious option would be monochromatic, which would consist of using flowers of one color in a variety of hues and shades. A Monochromatic approach is subtle, sophisticated and minimalistic, the greenery also helps to break up the color. A second harmonious option would be analogous, using colors adjacent to one another on the color wheel. An example of this would be using flowers that are red, yellow and orange closely related colors helps to use a variety without going overboard.

For those of you who want more variety there are also some contrasting options for you to consider. The first option is using complimentary colors which are two colors found opposite on the color wheel (red/green, orange/blue, purple/yellow).  Since complimentary colors share no similar pigments you will get the maximum contrast, if your looking for contrast but don’t want to be too abrupt you could choose one main color and use the second as a filler color. You could also work with 3 equidistant colors (triads) or one color and the two colors on either side of it’s compliment (for example violet with yellow-green and yellow-orange).

Of course for those who want to stand out from the rest you could always go with a polychromatic pallet by using every color. This option can become quite chaotic if not planned out carefully, or absolutely stunning when done right. Whatever colors you want to experiment with, remember to have fun and choose the types of flowers you like.

Don’t forget that colors can also help to set a mood. Do you want a cheerful outdoor space or a calm and relaxing outdoor space? Warmer shades such as orange and yellow will help to create a cheerful outdoor space, fun for the whole family. While cooler shades like blue will help to create a calm and relaxing enviorment.

Need a little help choosing flowers in the colors you like?  Take a look at flowers for your gardens by color – red flowers, orange flowers, yellow flowers, blue flowers, purple flowers, pink flowers.

Crocus Flower

With Spring only 20 days away, we can’t help thinking about all the beautiful Spring flowers that will soon fill the landscape. While we anxiously await the first blooms of Spring, enjoy the beautiful eye candy below, while thinking about all your upcoming gardening projects!

 

Snow Drops - These dainty white flowers are always a reminder that Spring is right around the corner.
Snow Drops – These dainty white flowers are always a reminder that Spring is right around the corner.

 

Crocus - Another sign of Winters end crocus bloom between late Winter and early Spring.
Crocus – Another sign of Winters end crocus bloom between late Winter and early Spring.

 

Tulips - The popular flowers have long been a Spring icon and bloom from March to May.
Tulips – The popular flowers have long been a Spring icon and bloom from March to May.

 

Daffodil - These sunny flowers will soon brighten up the landscape with their vibrant shades of yellow.
Daffodil – These sunny flowers will soon brighten up the landscape with their vibrant shades of yellow.